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Episode 133      

featured Wiki of the Day Episode 134

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      Episode 135

Gumbo
Sat, 2017-Sep-16 01:15 UTC
Length - 3:54

Direct Link: http://wikioftheday.com/fwotd/fwotdpod20170916011501.mp3


Welcome to featured Wiki of the Day where we read the summary of the featured Wikipedia article every day.

The featured article for Saturday, 16 September 2017 is Gumbo.

Gumbo is a stew that may have originated in West Africa or was a traditional stew of the Choctaws served over corn grits and today is more known for being a dish in the state of Louisiana in the 18th century. It consists primarily of a strongly-flavored stock, meat or shellfish, a thickener, and what Louisianians call the "Holy Trinity" of vegetables, namely celery, bell peppers, and onions. Gumbo is often categorized by the type of thickener used, the vegetable okra, the Choctaw spice Kombo powder (dried and ground sassafras leaves), or roux, the French base made of flour and fat. The dish likely derived its name from either a word from a Bantu language for okra (ki ngombo) or the Choctaw word for filé (kombo).

Regardless of the name origins, Gumbo can be made with or without Okra or Filé powder. The preferred method in the historical New Orleans variation is with a French dark roux. The flavor of the Louisiana state dish has its origin in many cultures.

Several different varieties exist. Creole gumbo generally contains shellfish, tomatoes, and a dark roux, filé, or both. Cajun gumbo is generally based on a dark roux and is made with shellfish or fowl. Sausage or ham is often added to gumbos of either variety. After the base is prepared, vegetables are cooked down, and then meat is added. The dish simmers for a minimum of three hours, with shellfish and some spices added near the end. If desired, filé powder is added after the pot is removed from heat. Gumbo is traditionally served over rice. A third, lesser-known variety, the meatless gumbo z'herbes, is essentially a gumbo of slow-cooked greens.

The dish combines ingredients and culinary practices of several cultures, including French, Spanish, German, Filipino, West African, and Choctaw. Gumbo may have been based on traditional West African or native dishes, or may be a derivation of the French dish bouillabaisse, or Choctaw stew, but most likely all three dishes contributed to the original recipe. It was first described in 1802, and was listed in various cookbooks in the latter half of the 19th century. The dish gained more widespread popularity in the 1970s, after the United States Senate cafeteria added it to the menu in honor of Louisiana Senator Allen Ellender. The popularity of chef Paul Prudhomme in the 1980s spurred further interest in gumbo. The dish is the official cuisine of the state of Louisiana.

This recording reflects the Wikipedia text as of 01:15 UTC on Saturday, 16 September 2017.

For the full current version of the article, go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gumbo.

This podcast is produced by Abulsme Productions based on Wikipedia content and is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.

Abulsme Productions also produces Curmudgeon's Corner, a weekly current events podcast where the hosts discuss whatever is hot in the news each week. Check it out in your podcast player of choice.

This has been Brian. Thank you for listening to featured Wiki of the Day. If you enjoyed this podcast, you can find our archive, and our sister podcasts popular Wiki of the Day and random Wiki of the Day at wikioftheday.com. Subscribe and tell your friends to listen as well!


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Abulsme Productions also produces Curmudgeon's Corner, a current events podcast.
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