Currently being updated. Automatic reload in seconds.


 
Subscribe: RSS Podcasts iTunes
  Buy WotD Stuff!!
Episode 43      

random Wiki of the Day Episode 44

For current episodes, or for the rest of the Wiki of the Day family of podcasts go here.

      Episode 45

Black Hills Gold Rush
Fri, 2017-Jun-16 10:07 UTC
Length - 2:52


Welcome to random Wiki of the Day where we read the summary of a random Wikipedia page every day.

Our random article today is Black Hills Gold Rush.

The Black Hills Gold Rush took place in Dakota Territory in the United States. It began in 1874 following the Custer Expedition and reached a peak in 1876-77.

Rumors and poorly documented reports of gold in the Black Hills go back to the early 19th century. In the 1860s, Roman Catholic missionary Father De Smet is reported to have seen Sioux Indians carrying gold which they told him came from the Black Hills.

Prior to the Gold Rush, the Black Hills were used by Native Americans (primarily bands of Sioux but others also ranged through the area). The United States government recognized the Black Hills as belonging to the Sioux by the Treaty of Laramie in 1868. Despite being within Indian territory, and therefore off-limits, white Americans were increasingly interested in the gold-mining possibilities of the Black Hills.

Prospectors found gold in 1874 near present-day Custer, South Dakota, but the deposit turned out to be small. The large placer gold deposits of Deadwood Gulch were discovered in November 1875, and in 1876, thousands of gold-seekers flocked to the new town of Deadwood, although it was still within Indian land.

The tale of first gold discovery in the Black Hills was thrown into question in 1887 by the discovery of what has become known as the Thoen Stone. Discovered by Louis Thoen on the slopes of Lookout Mountain, the stone purports to be the last testament of Ezra Kind who, along with six others, entered the Black Hills in 1833 (at a time when whites were forbidden by law and treaty from entering the area), "got all the gold we could carry" in June 1834, and were subsequently "killed by Indians beyond the high hill." While it may seem unlikely that someone who has "lost my gun and nothing to eat and Indians hunting me" would take the time to carve his story in sandstone, there is corroborating historical evidence for the Ezra Kind party.

Many of the miners came up the Missouri River from Kansas and eventually returned there.

This recording reflects the Wikipedia text as of 10:07 UTC on Friday, 16 June 2017.

For the full current version of the article, go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Hills_Gold_Rush.

This podcast is produced by Abulsme Productions based on Wikipedia content and is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.

Abulsme Productions also produces Curmudgeon's Corner, a weekly current events podcast where the hosts discuss whatever is hot in the news each week. Check it out in your podcast player of choice.

This has been Nicole. Thank you for listening to random Wiki of the Day. If you enjoyed this podcast, you can find our archive, and our sister podcasts popular Wiki of the Day and featured Wiki of the Day at wikioftheday.com. Subscribe and tell your friends to listen as well!


Archive:
  Episodes 1-100    Episodes 101-200    Episodes 201-300    Episodes 301-400    Episodes 401-441  

Feedback welcome at feedback@wikioftheday.com.
These podcasts are produced by Abulsme Productions based on Wikipedia content.
They are released under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Creative Commons License

Abulsme Productions also produces Curmudgeon's Corner, a current events podcast.
If you like that sort of thing, check it out too!


Page cached at 2018-07-19 11:10:10 UTC
Original calculation time was 0.6464 seconds

Page displayed at 2018-07-20 18:20:20 UTC
Page generated in 0.0054 seconds