Currently being updated. Automatic reload in seconds.


 
Subscribe: RSS Podcasts iTunes
  Buy WotD Stuff!!
Episode 24      

popular Wiki of the Day Episode 25

For current episodes, or for the rest of the Wiki of the Day family of podcasts go here.

      Episode 26

Egyptian calendar
Sun, 2017-May-28 01:11 UTC
Length - 2:54


Welcome to popular Wiki of the Day where we read the summary of a popular Wikipedia page every day.

With 398,888 views on Saturday, 27 May 2017 our article of the day is Egyptian calendar.

The ancient Egyptian calendar was a solar calendar with a 365-day year. The year consisted of three seasons of 120 days each, plus an intercalary month of 5 epagomenal days treated as outside of the year proper. Each season was divided into four months of 30 days. These twelve months were initially numbered within each season but came to also be known by the names of their principal festivals. Each month was divided into three 10-day periods known as decans or decades. The last two days of each decan were usually treated as a kind of weekend, with royal artisans and others free from work.

Because this calendrical year was nearly a quarter of a day shorter than the solar year, the Egyptian calendar lost about one day every four years relative to the Gregorian calendar. It is therefore sometimes referred to as the wandering year (Latin: annus vagus), as its months rotated about a third of the way through the solar year each century. Ptolemy III's Canopus Decree attempted to correct this through the introduction of a sixth epagomenal day every four years but the proposal was resisted by the Egyptian priests and people and abandoned until the establishment of the Alexandrian or Coptic calendar by Augustus. The introduction of a leap day to the Egyptian calendar made it equivalent to the reformed Julian calendar, although it continues to diverge from the Gregorian calendar at the turn of most centuries.

This civil calendar ran concurrently with an Egyptian lunar calendar which was used for some religious rituals and festivals. Some Egyptologists have described it as lunisolar, with an intercalary month supposedly added every two or three years to maintain its consistency with the solar year, but no evidence of such intercalation before the 4th century BC has yet been discovered.

This recording reflects the Wikipedia text as of 01:11 UTC on Sunday, 28 May 2017.

For the full current version of the article, go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egyptian_calendar.

This podcast is produced by Abulsme Productions based on Wikipedia content and is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.

Abulsme Productions also produces Curmudgeon's Corner, a weekly current events podcast where the hosts discuss whatever is hot in the news each week. Check it out in your podcast player of choice.

This has been Geraint. Thank you for listening to popular Wiki of the Day. If you enjoyed this podcast, you can find our archive, as well as random Wiki of the Day and featured Wiki of the Day at wikioftheday.com. Subscribe and tell your friends to listen as well!


Archive:
  Episodes 1-100    Episodes 101-200    Episodes 201-300    Episodes 301-388  

Feedback welcome at feedback@wikioftheday.com.
These podcasts are produced by Abulsme Productions based on Wikipedia content.
They are released under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Creative Commons License

Abulsme Productions also produces Curmudgeon's Corner, a current events podcast.
If you like that sort of thing, check it out too!


Page cached at 2018-05-26 06:39:02 UTC
Original calculation time was 0.6296 seconds

Page displayed at 2018-05-28 09:51:33 UTC
Page generated in 0.0050 seconds